The 21 Step Plan to beat constipation

James LiddellArticles, Chronic Illness, Health Tips, Lifestyle and Natural Medicine, Stress & DepressionLeave a Comment

 

Constipation is something that many of us experience from time to time and it often happens when we have travelled somewhere, changes our diets or take some medication. Constipation can make you feel sluggish, having headaches, nausea, bad breath and causes brain fog.

  1. Most patients are magnesium deficient and your first option should be to take high doses of magnesium at night to help muscle tone and muscle contraction in the colon – start with a 1500mg Magnesium supplement at night.
  2. Start your day with a green juice and repeat before supper if constipation persists. You can use cucumber as a base and combine that with a carrot, a beetroot, celery, broccoli, ginger, spinach etc.
  3. Exercise is vital for everyone especially for the constipated person – exercise will improve blood flow throughout the body, also the digestive tract and that will enhance bowel release.
  4. Eat a variety of vegetables every day and do not forget the fruit.
  5. Control stress – it fuels constipation. Meditate daily to manage stress.
  6. Eat un-sweetened yoghurt or take Probiotics daily because they can enhance colon health.
  7. Drink eight glasses of water a day, every day. It is the single most effective remedy for this condition. Drinking a full glass with some ginger, lemon, honey and/or dandelion each morning before breakfast may be beneficial.
  8. Eliminate food intolerances – the most common are wheat, gluten, dairy products, trans-fats and sugary foods; however, you can be intolerant to any food (food testing is recommended for tough cases). Go gluten-free and sugar-free for 4 weeks.
  9. Avoid all refined and processed food: sausages, luncheon meats, ham, etc. due to additives, high animal fat and poor fiber content.
  10. Consider to become vegetarian or vegan.
  11. Soak prunes in water (to increase water content and reduce sugar content – choose organic where possible) – eat 10 daily, or more in breakfast cereal or as a snack.
  12. Mix ground flaxseeds, pumpkin, sunflower seeds and sesame seeds as these are a very good source of fiber (1-3 dessertspoons full) and sprinkle on food.
  13. Oat bran (by Jungle Oats) is also a good source of fiber and can be added to breakfast cereals.
  14. Take a good fiber supplement containing psyllium. Use apple, rice or oat fiber if sensitive to psyllium. Aim for around 28 – 35g of fiber a day, increasing the amount slowly in order to avoid painful gas.
  15. Take a good, strong B-complex (containing up to 100 mg of each B vitamin daily) essential for digestion – a weak one will not have much effect.
  16. Omega 3 oils can soften the stool and is excellent for reducing inflammation not only in the gastro-intestinal tract, but also throughout the entire body, also offering helpful lubrication.
  17. Plan when you travel – travelers’ constipation is common. You have to manage constipation everyday – apply above advice.
  18. Colonic irrigation will get all old faeces out and will improve elimination.
  19. Remember heavy metal exposure can contribute to constipation.
  20. Medication is a last resort: Colon X (Xymogen), Herbal Fiber Blend, Solsulin Fiber, Dulcolax suppositories and Len-o-lax enemas.
  21. Squatty potty: it mimics natural squat posture – squattypotty.co.za

 

If you have followed all the above advice and still suffer from constipation – you need to consult your Integrative Healthcare Professional that will assess your situation and will then refer on, if needed.

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Dr James Liddell is an Integrated Healthcare Specialist (B.Pharm; M.Pharm; PhD; SAPC and PSSA registered) specialising in integrating different disciplines of healthcare to ensure holistic healthcare solutions. With 25 years experience as a Pharmacist, Dr of Nutrition and Complementary & Alternative Medicine Healthcare Practitioner, he believes lifestyle is ultimately the key to optimal health; a good nutritional foundation combined with sound emotional health are the fundamentals to what he calls ‘the optimal health zone’.

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